18
Aug
08

Guest Blogger: recycling your waste

Not a day goes by that I don’t think about my impact on the local environment. I say local environment because it’s the region that is affected most by my actions – the things I choose to eat, the containers or packaging that those items are sold in, where the product was grown (or made) and what it took to raise/create that product.

It’s impossible to walk about this planet without leaving the slightest eco-footprint. I don’t think people should be expected to do so – there is a balance where humans can co-exist with surrounding life. What bothers me is when people have the opportunity to leave a lesser impact, by doing simple things like recycling but choose to throw the plastic in the garbage to be hauled off to a landfill in down in Oregon – or anywhere else for that matter. It’s completely irresponsible. It was just last week that I was down on Seattle’s waterfront and saw a guy finish his bottle of water and toss it in the trash along the sidewalk. Looking about 100 feet beyond him I could see a blue recycling bin. I was more than irritated. Not only by the man that carelessly tossed his bottle, but the bottled water companies that encourage this behavior, and by the city of Seattle that loves to claim they care so much about the local environment and are all about reducing impact and increasing sustainability.

How difficult would it be to put a recycling container next to EVERY trash receptacle? Or why is it that there are no recycling containers in the parks around here? Why doesn’t Starbucks have recycling containers for the plastic cups? How are they able to sell just shy of 3 billion drinks per year at over priced rates, but not pay the premium for cups that can be fully recycled? – especially when the sleeves read statements like “help save the earth” and boast that they’re made with 60% recycled material.

I better stop here because I could go on and on about Starbucks.

Advertisements

5 Responses to “Guest Blogger: recycling your waste”


  1. 1 Kristina
    August 19, 2008 at 6:44 am

    At least grocery stores will soon be charging for bags, thus encouraging us to either reuse the plastic ones they currently provide, or better yet, use the canvas totes that so many stores are currently selling. They are a lot sturdier than the plastic and paper and can even hold more. Every little bit counts!

  2. 2 Derek
    August 19, 2008 at 6:33 pm

    Ya, but the WFI (washington food industry – or something) is trying to put a stop to the bag ban. They have a petition and are trying to get enough people to sign against it. Ridiculous – I know. We’ll see what happens…
    Anyway, if anyone is looking for where to pick up tote bags, I recommend Whole Foods. I don’t stand by everything Whole Foods does, but their bags are a buck apiece and made with great quality. They are almost as big as a paper bag and can hold quite a bit of weight. Also, many stores give discounts for bringing your own bags – so they pay for themselves fairly quick.

  3. 3 Caleb
    August 19, 2008 at 11:34 pm

    I can see where your coming from. Why not ban plastic bags and only use paper bags. Paper is recycleble and if its cutting to many trees down thats not a problem. Trees grow back

  4. 4 shelby
    August 20, 2008 at 12:49 am

    I came across these cool looking reusable bags that fit in to one tiny sack. It seems way easier to take on the go than toting the large canvas reusable bags around. I believe they fit on to the plastic bag holders in the store making them easy to fill. I think I might ask for them for my birthday. too cute.

    http://olivesmart.com/

  5. September 16, 2008 at 1:59 am

    Hello. I read your blog above and I wanted to pass along this website that I thought you might be interested in. They are taking refused items that people have left out on the curb or have thrown away and are fixing them and donating to homeless shelters, transitional housing and animal shelters. All while saving the environment! It’s great to see this is catching on.
    Thank you. http://www.refusedreused.com


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


a blog for anyone, but mostly for me.

%d bloggers like this: